Cycle yourself lean

Caveat:   Blitzes are all too often un-targeted, .  done with little concern as to the overall impact on the total company.   The results of such un-focused blitzes typically have a significant local impact, microcosms of excellence , but little or no impact on overall company well being.   See “Solutions Looking for a Problem” below.

  • Blow-Through BOM’s (Bills of Material):   Many “assembled product” manufacturers need to maintain subassembly identity, and/or control configuration, for replacement parts.   In these circumstances, rather than have a flat bill of material, it is much more practical to continue to show all subassembly levels on the bill of material. A “Blow Through” level, allows the subassembly’s parts to be called out, for kitting or backflush purposes, on the next higher level assembly.   The MRP algorithm “blows through” .  treats the subassembly’s parts as if they were called out on the next higher-level assembly.
  • Boom-Bust Cycle:   Some Causes:   I just got off the phone with a steel finishing plant / distributor.   He said that their on-time delivery performance was terrible, and that their lead times had extended considerably.   When I mentioned some ways to fix this issue, his response was classic:   “The customers have learned to expect it”   “We can’t turn down orders.   We just promise what they want to hear, then beg forgiveness.” And what do the customers do in these situations?   You’ve go it!   They double order.   They order high “just in case”.   They ask for it early, knowing full well that it will be late.

    For a continuous process where parts move from one operation to the next, the target in-process stock should be one piece. Based on the cycle time, this may not be possible, but should be the target you are striving for. The actual number of parts between processes will depend upon the actual operations. The better the line balancing, the less parts that will be required between operations. The key here is to ensure that the bottleneck process (slowest process) always has a supply of parts to process. Any lost time here will be unrecoverable without overtime.

    I am working on implementing OEE in one of our machines that makes centertubes for automotive oil filters. The steel is rolled and each part number has specific diameter and length. However, the run-rates vary for each part numbers. I am somewhat able to calculate Takt time for each part number based on the standard run-rate. However, the problem for me is to determine Ideal Cycle Time. The machine can run as fast as 65 PPM for one part number while it runs as slow as 13 PPM for some other part number. In this case, what would be the optimal way to calculate Ideal Cycle Time for each part numbers? As you know, Ideal Cycle time is required to calculate Performance Metric of OEE.

     
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    Cycle yourself lean

    cycle yourself lean

     
    Already know about Lean and Six Sigma? Get started with free downloads >

    Tags 5S business business leadership Change Management company continuous improvement factory tour healthcare innovation Kaizen kanban kanban board kanban boards leader leadership lean Lean Consumption Lean Culture Lean for Software lean manufacturing lean methodologies lean principles lean six sigma Lean Six Sigma Tools and Templates Downloads lean thinking management manufacturing methodology organization productivity quality quality improvement Queue Queues Queuing shmula shmula blog six sigma six sigma tools toyota Turnaround Management Waiting Line Management waste workflow Global Six Sigma Courses :

    • Six Sigma Yellow Belt
    • Six Sigma Green Belt
    • Six Sigma Black Belt
    • Six Sigma Master Black Belt
    © 2017 - Shmula LLC | Terms of Use | Refund Policy | Privacy Policy | Resources | Archives | Comment Policy and Disclosures | Contact

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